on-off-switch:

Happy 125th anniversary, Nintendo!

Founded on september 23, 1889, originally as a producer of handmade Hanafuda cards, going into several small niche business as well, such as cab services and even love hotels to finally getting involved into toys/electronic business by late 70s. The rest is history…

Here’s to another 125 years. Stay awesome.

Reblogged from: donchurroman · Source: on-off-switch
Tagged with: videogames ·
hotmessm0nster:


"El Viejo San Juan"

These colors!!!

hotmessm0nster:

"El Viejo San Juan"

These colors!!!

(Source: jessocasio)

Reblogged from: hotmessm0nster · Source: jessocasio
Tagged with: places · Architecture ·

             L E G E N D S   W I L L   N E V E R   D I E 

Reblogged from: llawlietfanart · Source: raikis
Tagged with: anime ·
scienceyoucanlove:

Originally, the word “nebula” referred to almost any extended astronomical object (other than planets and comets). The etymological root of “nebula” means “cloud”. As is usual in astronomy, the old terminology survives in modern usage in sometimes confusing ways. We sometimes use the word “nebula” to refer to galaxies, various types of star clusters and various kinds of interstellar dust/gas clouds. More strictly speaking, the word “nebula” should be reserved for gas and dust clouds and not for groups of stars.By order in which they appear from top to bottom, left to right, here are the main types and some provided examples for visual reference:Planetary Nebulae: Sh2-188Planetary nebulae are shells of gas thrown out by some stars near the end of their lives. Our Sun will probably evolve a planetary nebula in about 5 billion years. They have nothing at all to do with planets; the terminology was invented because they often look a little like planets in small telescopes. A typical planetary nebula is less than one light-year across.
read more about the others 

scienceyoucanlove:

Originally, the word “nebula” referred to almost any extended astronomical object (other than planets and comets). The etymological root of “nebula” means “cloud”. As is usual in astronomy, the old terminology survives in modern usage in sometimes confusing ways. We sometimes use the word “nebula” to refer to galaxies, various types of star clusters and various kinds of interstellar dust/gas clouds. More strictly speaking, the word “nebula” should be reserved for gas and dust clouds and not for groups of stars.

By order in which they appear from top to bottom, left to right, here are the main types and some provided examples for visual reference:

Planetary Nebulae: Sh2-188

Planetary nebulae are shells of gas thrown out by some stars near the end of their lives. Our Sun will probably evolve a planetary nebula in about 5 billion years. They have nothing at all to do with planets; the terminology was invented because they often look a little like planets in small telescopes. A typical planetary nebula is less than one light-year across.

read more about the others 

Reblogged from: faeries-and-nature · Source: scienceyoucanlove
Tagged with: sky ·

(Source: midori-manga)

Reblogged from: donchurroman · Source: midori-manga
Tagged with: art ·

mashable:

#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Confronts How Minority Deaths Are Portrayed In Media

Following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen on Saturday, and the ensuing media portrayal of his death, Twitter expressed outrage in the form of a hashtag: #IfTheyGunnedMeDown

Reblogged from: unicorn-chicken · Source: mashable
Tagged with: history · this is so true it hurts ·

"‎’Slut’ is attacking women for their right to say yes. ‘Friend Zone’ is attacking women for their right to say no."

And “bitch” is attacking women for their right to call you on it. 

(Source: emilys-nostalgia)

Reblogged from: unicorn-chicken · Source: emilys-nostalgia
Tagged with: women ·

(Source: morethanphotography)

Reblogged from: elquetecocinalascaraotas · Source: morethanphotography
Tagged with: places · sky ·

unexplained-events:

Lucifer (Morningstar)

A wax sculpture depicting the devil snared in a set of power lines built by Paul Fryer. The sculpture is illuminated by the church’s stained glass windows.

It can be seen at The Holy Trinity Church in Marylebone, Westminster.

Reblogged from: perramaldita · Source: unexplained-events
Tagged with: art ·

(Source: feminismisahatemovement)

Reblogged from: just-a-skinny-boy · Source: feminismisahatemovement
Tagged with: women · men ·
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